June 17, 2009: Dick Smith and Linda Blair share a sweet moment together at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ A Tribute to Dick Smith: The Godfather of Special Makeup Effects.

June 17, 2009: Dick Smith and Linda Blair share a sweet moment together at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ A Tribute to Dick Smith: The Godfather of Special Makeup Effects.

1 August, 201465 notes
Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.
Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight! 
After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.
His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.
[[MORE]]
In 1984, Smith began offering training through his advanced make-up course and has mentored some of the biggest names in the industry, from Oscar winning make-up artists Stan Winston, Greg Cannom and Rick Baker (who’s first professional job was assistant to Smith on The Exorcist), to directors Guillermo del Toro and J. J. Abrams.
Smith was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with a retrospective tribute in 2009, and two years later he became the first make-up artist to receive an Honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement at the Governor’s Awards (watch Linda Blair’s speech here, and Smith’s emotional acceptance here).
With an astonishing career spanning over 60 years, Dick Smith’s timeless body of work, passion and generosity has influenced many and will continue to inspire for generations to come.
Rest in peace, "The Godfather of Make-Up."

Dick Smith, legendary make-up artist known for his groundbreaking and iconic work on such films as The Godfather, Amadeus, Altered States, Taxi Driver and The Exorcist, has passed away at age 92.

Born in Larchmont, New York, in 1922, Richard Emerson Smith began his career in 1945 as NBC’s first staff make-up artist and by 1950 was the head of the make-up department, training his own staff of 25 budding artists. His self-taught talents quickly earned him several Emmy nominations and a win in 1967 for Mark Twain Tonight!

After 14 years with NBC where he pioneered techniques using foam latex, plastics and make-up tones for colour television, Smith then moved on to the big screen.

His technical innovations in films such as Little Big Man and The Godfather were initially seen by his peers as unorthodox, however, those techniques soon became industry standards which are still used to this day. Smith went on to create some of his most memorable work transforming young Linda Blair into a demon-possessed child and aging Max Von Sydow thirty-seven years in The Exorcist, along with the landmark full-body latex suits and fantastical effects in Altered States.

Read More

31 July, 2014571 notes
Jason Miller and Max Von Sydow in a scene from The Exorcist.

Jason Miller and Max Von Sydow in a scene from The Exorcist.

31 July, 201440 notes

Artwork by Caniglia for the 40th anniversary limited edition of William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist released by Lonely Road Books.

29 July, 2014213 notes

Make-up artist Dick Smith, assisted by hair stylist Bill Farley, fits the vomiting apparatus on actress Eileen Dietz on the set of The Exorcist.

Smith’s apparatus was created using a heat-forming plastic molded into flat tubes, which connected through a pipe leading into Dietz’s mouth. The tubing was then hidden under a partial latex mask appliance.

19 July, 2014307 notes

Behind the scenes photos from the filming of the the crucifix abuse scene on the set of The Exorcist. Linda Blair’s head-spinning dummy double sits in position, while director William Friedkin’s album of continuity polaroids can be spotted on the right side table.

17 July, 20141,965 notes
Eileen Dietz in a scene from The Exorcist.

Eileen Dietz in a scene from The Exorcist.

16 July, 2014954 notes

The Exorcist sparked an outcry of controversy from religious groups during its original theatrical run in 1973/4. While many lauded its strong message of faith; others interpreted the film’s unrelenting portrayal of evil as exploitative and pornographic. Christian evangelist Billy Graham even went as far as to publicly denounce the film, insisting that there was a "power of evil in the fabric of the film itself".

Here is one example of a flyer handed out by Christian groups at a screening in the UK, warning impressionable moviegoers of the “adverse effects” the film may cause them to experience.

15 July, 201474 notes
Original painting by Basil Gogos for the cover of Famous Monsters of Filmland, issue #111.

Original painting by Basil Gogos for the cover of Famous Monsters of Filmland, issue #111.

14 July, 2014564 notes
1 2 3 4 5
BUY THE EXORCIST: THE COMPLETE ANTHOLOGY ON BLU-RAY